How to optimize your holidays with self care and simple yoga practice in Sphinx Pose

Optimize Your Holidays: Simplify, Create, Take Care of Yourself, Connect and Practice Yoga

Bonny Casel, ND, MAMH, MBSLM, FBRI
Updated: 
January 02, 2021

“The smallest act of kindness is worth more than the grandest intention” – Oscar Wilde

Over the years, I’ve steadily simplified my activities and responsibilities throughout the Christmas season and truly benefited from slowing down and focusing this time on meaningful connection, reflection, and self-care.

There is a magic to the holidays that touches my inner child. I love the ritual of decorating the tree and making the house festive. I bring out my favorite Christmas music and films just for the holidays. My daughter and I make our ornaments and Christmas cards, and I love shopping for just the right gifts for family and friends.

Most of all, this is a time when I connect with the feeling from childhood of the holidays stretched out before me. There’s so much time to expand into, and so many wonderful experiences to look forward to—time to relax with family and friends, time to putter and just be.

But this year feels different. After nearly a year of social isolation, the impact of unfamiliar stresses has affected each of us in unique and unexpected ways. I am acutely aware of how burned out and stressed many people feel as we draw closer to the holidays.

I have friends who have spent the last nine months working harder and longer hours than they ever have in their lives. Other friends lost their jobs and had to go into survival mode. I have retired or furloughed friends who have spent the last nine months completely alone, while others haven’t had a minute alone—literally. On the other hand, I also have friends for whom the pandemic offered the gift of a much-needed extended holiday, where they caught up on reading, picked up new hobbies, and enjoyed socially distanced gatherings with friends in the park.

Whether we have found personal peace through the ups and downs of this time or not, the accumulated stress on the fabric of our social connectivity, and society as a whole, has been undeniable. Many people are too stressed and exhausted to contemplate festivities, and others need human connection and happy times more than ever.

Who would have imagined that a single year could bring so much change to our rhythms of being, our relationships with others, and, in many cases, our home and work lives, and in such varying ways?

With Significant Change Comes Great Opportunity

How to destress, practice self care, and make the coming holiday an opportunity to reset for the new year with yoga

In light of such diverse needs and circumstances during this time, I’ve gathered some thoughts on ways to reestablish healthy rhythms, destress, ground, take care of ourselves, and make the coming holiday an opportunity to reset for the new year. As we reach the longest night of the year, stand still, and then step toward a new year, let’s also think of the deepest needs of those we care for. This has been a tough year, and perhaps you know someone who truly needs your love and support.

How to Establish Life Rhythms that Support Wellness

How to Set a Morning Routine

As the weeks of lockdown turned into months, keeping a routine became increasingly difficult for many. Work seeped into our personal lives and then took over, or isolation and lack of structure led to every day becoming a pajama day. A regular routine is a vital part of living a healthy, productive, and meaningful life. If you feel like you’ve lost touch with healthy habits, this is an excellent place to start.

1. Begin the day by drinking a full glass of water. This will activate healthy elimination, immediately increase your mental alertness, and boost your metabolism and immunity. When we are inside with central heating during the winter, our skin can quickly become dehydrated and lose its glow. Drinking pure cool water will help to wake up your mind and body, and set you off on a positive start to the day.

2. Head straight to the shower! The sooner you shower upon waking, the better. You will notice the difference in how you feel, not only physically, but emotionally and mentally too. Start with a hot shower to cleanse, then complete with a cold shower for at least a few seconds, but ideally for a full minute. This has a wide range of healthful benefits, as it increases circulation and oxygenation of the blood, improves cognition, immunity, metabolism, and energy levels, and significantly improves your ability to tolerate the cold in winter.

3. Once dressed, head straight out the door and take a walk. Exercise and exposure to sunlight are essential in winter, and breathing fresh air in the morning will further energize you for the day. Exercise releases endorphins, which help reduce stress. Walking stimulates the lymphatic system, which will support its role in cleansing body tissues while also boosting your immune system.

4. While walking, be mindful of the nature that you see. Attend to the sky’s colors, the light on the leaves, the rain patterns, and the shades of the colors you see. Notice the scents and sounds surrounding you, the feel of the air against your skin, and the warmth of your hands in your pockets. Remember that you are a part of nature, part of this world, and that your connection with it can be deeply healing.

Note too that in winter, midday is the best time to spend at least 20 minutes outdoors as this is when the light is brightest. A short lunchtime walk outside will help boost your Vitamin D levels and is an excellent support for reducing or preventing seasonal affective disorder (SAD).

How to establish a healthy and positive morning routine for wellness during holidays
 
This morning routine is a simple way to make a positive and healthful start to the day. If you have the inclination and the time, you can practice yoga, meditation, journaling, or another activity that you enjoy. These simple steps can make all the difference in how the rest of your day unfolds.

Make time and space for your yoga practice. Winter is a natural time to turn inward and practice Restorative Yoga, but your practice doesn’t have to be limited to only Restorative poses. Perhaps a more vigorous practice would help dissipate some of the heaviness that overindulgence can bring. Or maybe your nervous system is feeling agitated or depleted. In that case, you might want to nurture yourself with a relaxing, quiet yoga practice.

How to Set an Evening Routine

A regular evening routine is also an essential part of a balanced and healthy lifestyle. A simple structure that allows one to disconnect from work and wind down from the day is one of the secrets to longevity and emotional wellness. In winter, it becomes dark so early that one can lose touch with regular schedules and get into the habit of working into the night or spending hours in front of the television. Consider the following suggestions to help create an evening routine that allows you to relax, while also allowing for space to get in touch with facets of life that nourish and inspire you.

1. Remove the dust of the day! Set a time where the workday ends, and home life begins. Mark this moment with a shower or bath and fresh clothes or pajamas. Again, ending the shower or bath with cold water is an excellent support for health and wellness.

2. Set a time for dinner at least four hours before bedtime. The evening meal should be smaller than the midday meal, as eating larger meals in the evening is hard on digestion. When eaten fewer than four hours before sleep, a big dinner can impact circadian rhythms, leading to weight gain, emotional instability, and lowered cognition.

3. Create a list of activities that you enjoy that are suitable for the evening hours. On my list is hand sewing; reading; journaling; bathing; candlelit conversations; swapping foot, head, hand massages; watering the plants; and meditation. In the buildup to the holidays, I also like making Christmas cards and other Yuletide crafts. When I’m overly tired, it is tempting to turn on the television. (I’m particularly fond of historical Korean and Bollywood dramas.) Although this may seem most comfortable, it isn’t what actually feels good if it becomes a regular habit. Creating a list of activities and having the resources prepared in advance makes it easier to establish a more fulfilling evening routine.

4. Establish a regular bedtime and use the hour before bed to wind down completely. Ideally, turn off the television, computer, and/or mobile phone two full hours before bedtime, as the light from electronic devices affects our circadian rhythms. If you struggle with going to bed early enough to feel refreshed in the morning, you may need to reset your circadian rhythms. This rhythm is actually very personal, and the best way to find out your natural rhythm is to go camping in nature without an alarm clock for a week or more. Your body will soon establish its natural waking and sleeping times that leave you fully refreshed. These will vary a little at different times of the year. Given that it’s winter, you can reset your circadian rhythms at home by not using an alarm clock, but it will usually take a week or two longer than if you are sleeping outside. Consider taking advantage of the holidays to find your healthy sleep rhythm.

How to Enjoy a Balanced Christmas

Family members enjoying the benefits of a balanced and simple holiday celebration with a focus on wellness

Simplify the Feast!

This may seem counter to the feasting spirit, but a shift from thinking of Christmas as a consumer toward remembering that it is, first and foremost, a holiday will help to get your mind on a different track! How often do we get holidays—not just a break from work, but a break from work as a community? If we don’t take the time now to relax, you, your friends and your family lose a profound opportunity. 

1. Create a Christmas menu with a single main dish, an abundance of vegetables, and a single dessert. Since when does a festive meal have to be complicated? Your digestion will thank you, you won’t waste food, and you will spend far less time shopping and in the kitchen.

2. Too often, I’ve seen a single person slogging away in the kitchen for most of the Christmas holidays while others are relaxing. This isn’t right, whether you are alone in the kitchen or whether you’re a loved one watching from outside. Rather than making meals on your own, make them with your family and/or friends. Kids can join in too. My daughter and I love making festive meals together. She has been an active participant in making Christmas meals since she was three years old. Give children a job that they can do, assist them if needed, and enjoy the process.

3. The experience of preparing a meal is greatly enhanced by preparing the meal slowly, giving time for everyone to bond over the conversation. When it comes time to clean up, many hands make light work, so do it together!

4. If it’s impractical to have a group of family and friends in the kitchen, consider having a potluck. Just make sure to do this in an organized way so you don’t end up with a table full of desserts.

Share the Holiday with Distant Friends and Family

If you are unable to spend time with your family or friends this Christmas, consider a Skype or Zoom feast where you share the whole process of preparing and eating a festive meal or opening presents around the tree, from a distance. I learned this trick when I was living in Devon, and my daughter was studying in New Zealand. We would spend entire evenings together, chatting, watching films, and enjoying meals. She would watch the movie on her side, and I would watch it on mine, pausing and starting at the same time if we wanted to chat. It truly was a bonding experience where we didn’t feel so far apart from one another!

Authentic Connection is the True Gift

Wellness tips to optimize enjoyment of the holidays with authentic connection and simplicity

Many people equate the Christmas season with giving and receiving gifts. But spending money on gifts can lead to financial stress. And purchasing things that people really don’t need, at a time when there are so many who are not getting their needs met, feels very much out of sync with the times. Rather than giving gifts, consider giving something that a friend needs. Perhaps run some errands for them or volunteer to take care of their kids for a few hours so they can have some space. Or simply spend time with those you care about. People don’t need gifts; they need connection.

Another gift to consider is sharing stories! This can be done just as easily through Zoom or Skype as it can be done in person. Let your family or guests know in advance that each person should come prepared with a true story about a time in their life that had a significant impact on making them who they are today—a story they haven’t shared before. As the host or the instigator of this idea, it is important to be the first to share a story so that everyone can get a feel for the authenticity and depth expected of them. This is a beautiful way to learn about your loved ones and share quality time together.

Community Giving

One of the challenges of a “normal” Christmas is finding gifts for those hard-to-please relatives who have everything. This year, with so many people in need after losing their jobs and even their homes, it’s the perfect time to expand our circle of compassion and giving. Our relatives will understand and appreciate our choice to dedicate gift funds to community giving. Through making this choice, we have the opportunity to lift the heart and ease the hardship of those who genuinely need to feel that society cares. One of my favorite sayings is, “If you have more than you need, build a bigger table, not a higher wall.” Those of us who have made it through this year and still have a cozy home and a secure income are truly blessed. Sharing this blessing with others is the gift that keeps on giving.

Giving to charities is a quick stop way to do this, but I highly encourage you to find a means to help your local community. Also, if you have a friend or acquaintance that needs your help, there is no better time to embody the true meaning of friendship. Many hands make light work, and if someone you know is struggling in ways beyond your means to help, gather friends and family together to make the difference you want to see in their life.

I hope that some of these suggestions are inspiring for you, and I’d love to hear how you make this time of year truly a holiday. Meanwhile, I wish you a peaceful, nourishing, and festive holiday, with a deep connection to loved ones, even if from afar, and the space to touch base with what really makes you happy.

 

Tom Myers, YogaUOnline presenter, wellness, Anatomy Trains

 

Reprinted with permission from Bonny Casel & https://schoolofnaturalmedicine.com/

Bonny Casel, Teacher, Naturopath, writerBonny Casel ND, MAMH, MBSLM, FBRI is the founder and director of the School of Natural Medicine UK, course creator of Lifestyle Medicine for Self Care, and founding director of Council for Self-Care. She is also a training provider for NHS hospital staff, guest lecturer, and speaks internationally with a focus on holistic pro-health care.

Bonny began her teaching career in 1988 and has studied with many of the leading pioneers of natural medicine of the last century, including Dr. Bernard Jensen, Dr. John Christopher, Dr. Farida Sharan, Dorothy Hall, and Denny Johnson, as well as scientists Bruce Lipton and Nassim Haramein. She has authored several accredited courses, including the comprehensive Healing Diets Nutritional Consultant and Quantum Botanicals Advanced. 

Dedicated to educating, empowering, and inspiring people to achieve independent health and quality of life, Bonny is also committed to lifelong continuing education, experiential self-care, and to contribute what she can to make the world a better place. Please visit https://schoolofnaturalmedicine.com/and www.lifestyle-medicine.com to find out more.